Doctors need to pay more attention to mental health

By Satesh Bidaisee, Associate Professor of Public Health and Preventive Medicine, St. George's University
October 17, 2018

More than 40 million Americans suffer from depression, anxiety, bipolar disorder, and other mental illnesses.[1] Yet more than half these folks go untreated.[2] Medical professionals must devote more attention to identifying and treating patients with mental illness.

Mental illness afflicts people of all ages. Ten percent of children and young people suffer from some form of mental illness, according to the Mental Health Foundation.[3] The National Alliance on Mental Illness reports that “half of all lifetime cases of mental illnesses start by age 14.”[4]

Our aging population is also at great risk. By 2030, the number of Americans over the age of 75 will increase by over 50 percent.[5] And according to the WHO, mental illness and disorders afflict more than 20 percent of people over the age of 60.[6]

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Underserved Communities Need International Medical Graduates

By Dr. G. Richard Olds, President of St. George's University
October 6, 2018

The United States could be short up to 120,000 physicians — including 50,000 primary care doctors — by 2030.[1] The shortage will be most severe in low-income, rural, and already-underserved regions.

Thankfully, there’s a solution. International medical graduates are uniquely suited to fill these gaps in the doctor workforce — more so than their domestically trained counterparts. It’s time we welcome more of them.

Many people are already struggling to access doctors. More than 84 million Americans live in an area that is short on primary care physicians, according to the Kaiser Family Foundation.[2]

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Smoking Doesn’t Just Hurt Humans — It’s Killing Our Pets

By Satesh Bidaisee, Associate Professor of Public Health and Preventive Medicine, St. George's University
September 20, 2018

It’s well-known that smoking is terrible for humans. Nearly half a million Americans die from smoking-related diseases every year.[1] Second-hand smoking causes over 40,000 deaths.[2]

But there’s an overlooked group that suffers as well: pets. Animals that live in homes with smokers have much higher risks of developing many fatal diseases.

To protect humans and pets from the dangers of smoking, future medical and veterinary professionals must be educated on the many connections between animal and human health.

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