Clean Air Is in Short Supply

By HSealy
September 5, 2017

The air we breathe is getting dirtier — and more dangerous. Air pollution already kills over two million people annually. Because of increasing pollution, an extra 60,000 people will die in 2030.[1]

Smog — a harmful mixture of pollutants emitted from vehicles and factories — will cause most of these deaths.[2][3] Curbing smog will require a global education campaign targeted at public health and medical professionals.

Smog aggravates the respiratory system.[4] With prolonged exposure, it can cause lung cancer.[5]

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It’s Hurricane Season. Small Coastal Nations Need Help.

By HSealy
August 29, 2017

Hurricane Harvey is bearing down on Texas. Meteorologists say the storm could swamp parts of the state with up to 30 inches of rain, causing mass flooding.[1]

Harvey is the first hurricane to hit the Lone Star State in nearly a decade. Small, coastal nations in the Atlantic haven’t been so lucky. In recent years, storms have repeatedly hammered these countries,[2] which lack the resources to predict, prepare for, and recover from natural disasters.[3]

Hurricanes will intensify in the coming years due to climate change. For years, developed nations have emitted huge amounts of carbon into the atmosphere, trapping in heat and creating the perfect environment for storm development. Read More »

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Mental Health at Your Fingertips — Literally

By Satesh Bidaisee, Associate Professor of Public Health and Preventive Medicine, St. George's University
August 11, 2017

Every year, mental illness afflicts some 60 million Americans.[1] Unfortunately, only 40 percent of these people will seek medical attention. [2]

That’s a somber reality. But there’s an easy way for them to get help — with little more than the push of a button.

A number of smartphone apps are now available that can help people cope with mental illness and live happier, healthier lives. These apps provide everything from self-reflection tips to breathing exercises to personalized counseling. It’s time to encourage more people to use them. Read More »

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