Developed Nations Can’t Afford to Ignore Surging Sea Levels

By HSealy
June 15, 2017

Over 4 million people in Caribbean and Pacific island nations reside in areas now prone to heavy flooding, partly due to rising sea levels caused by climate change.[1] 

It’d be a mistake for developed nations to ignore these people’s plight. Left unchecked, rising sea levels could devastate coastal communities in wealthy countries, too. These richer nations need to take steps now to combat climate change to protect smaller countries — and themselves.

Here’s the science behind the rising tides. Read More »

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Carbon Markets Key to Battling Climate Change

By HSealy
June 6, 2017

As summer approaches in many countries, scientists are monitoring the earth’s temperatures — last year was the hottest on record.[1] Glaciers are melting, sea levels are rising, and natural disasters are spiraling out of control.[2]

Fortunately, nations are no longer standing idly by, watching the climate change. So far, 195 countries have signed the Paris Agreement, which aims to limit warming to less than 1.5 degrees C above pre-industrial levels, and have net zero greenhouse gas emissions in the second half of the century.[3]

In order to achieve these goals, an effective price will have to be placed on carbon.  That’s what some experts in the Caribbean are proposing now. Read More »

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Prevent Epidemics with a “One Health” Approach

By Satesh Bidaisee, Associate Professor of Public Health and Preventive Medicine, St. George's University
June 5, 2017

A new Zika outbreak could have already started — and we likely wouldn’t know it yet. A recent study published in Nature concludes that the virus spread for months before infections were first reported in South America.[1]

Fortunately, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recently announced a new, faster method of determining whether mosquitoes are carrying the virus.[2] Detecting the presence of Zika-ridden mosquitos — rather than having to wait for signs of infection in humans — could give doctors and public health authorities the early warning they need to contain outbreaks.

Human health is inextricably linked with animal health and that of the environment — a concept known as “One Health.” Approximately 60 percent of infectious diseases, including Zika, Ebola, and the avian flu, originate in animals.[3] That’s why physicians, veterinarians, and public health experts must to work together to address epidemics. Read More »

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