Mental Health at Your Fingertips — Literally

By Satesh Bidaisee, Associate Professor of Public Health and Preventive Medicine, St. George's University
August 11, 2017

Every year, mental illness afflicts some 60 million Americans.[1] Unfortunately, only 40 percent of these people will seek medical attention. [2]

That’s a somber reality. But there’s an easy way for them to get help — with little more than the push of a button.

A number of smartphone apps are now available that can help people cope with mental illness and live happier, healthier lives. These apps provide everything from self-reflection tips to breathing exercises to personalized counseling. It’s time to encourage more people to use them. Read More »

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A Cure for Canada’s Medical Maldistribution

By Sandra Banner
August 7, 2017

There’s a crisis in Canada — a lack of access to timely health care.

According to Statistics Canada, a government agency, 4.5 million Canadians do not have a family doctor.[1] That’s the largest figure since the country established its socialized healthcare system in 1968.[2]

In British Columbia, the number of Canadians seeking a primary care doctor has increased from 176,000 in 2010 to more than 200,000 in 2015.[3] Several rural communities in the province have reported that hospitals shut down their emergency departments or cut hours because they didn’t have enough medical personnel.[4] Read More »

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Making Water Risk-Free

By StGeorgesUniversity
August 3, 2017

Eight cups. That’s the minimum amount of water a person must drink per day according to most doctors.

Water consumption is crucial to human life, and drinking healthy amounts can help regulate weight, body temperature, and even brain function.[1] But the water we drink can also be a source of serious health risks.

When we use water for normal activities — from washing our hands to irrigating crops — it becomes exposed to harmful contaminants. What was initially clean water becomes wastewater, contaminated by domestic pollutants like sewage or industrial waste such as chemical byproducts.[2] Read More »

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