For a healthy heart, get rid of trans fats

By Satesh Bidaisee, Associate Professor of Public Health and Preventive Medicine, St. George's University
September 4, 2018

Every year, more than 17 million people die from cardiovascular disease. Trans fats are a major cause of this heart disease epidemic.[1]

These fats are found in snacks, frozen foods, and fried treats. They make food taste delicious. But they’re terrible for our bodies.[2] 

Health officials and doctors must educate patients about the dangers of trans fats — and help people to avoid them.

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Climate change is putting children’s lives at risk

By Satesh Bidaisee, Associate Professor of Public Health and Preventive Medicine, St. George's University
August 27, 2018

Our planet’s youngest members didn’t cause climate change — but they’ll be the ones who suffer most from it. A new study from the journal Pediatrics estimates that kids bear 88 percent of the burden of climate-change related diseases.[1]

To save thousands of young lives, it’s critical that the next generation of public health professionals double down on the fight against climate change.

Climate change hurts children in many ways. It leads to more severe and more frequent extreme weather events, like droughts and heat waves. Those harsh weather patterns diminish agricultural production and kill livestock.[2][3] Children need good nutrition to grow and develop properly, so limited access to food and water can have a disproportionate impact on their health. By 2030, nearly 100,000 additional children will die from malnutrition.[4]

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Take care of your skin this summer

By Satesh Bidaisee, Associate Professor of Public Health and Preventive Medicine, St. George's University
August 6, 2018

More than 3 million Americans are diagnosed with skin cancer every year.[1] That’s more than every other cancer combined.[2]

The culprit? Sunshine. The sun is the primary source of ultraviolet rays, which damage skin cells.[3] Roughly 90 percent[4] of skin cancer cases are caused by excessive exposure to UV rays.[5]

Even just a few burns can cause long-lasting harm. Getting just five sunburns during childhood can increase the risk of melanoma — one of the most dangerous skin cancers — by 80 percent.[6]

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