Inactive Lifestyles Hurt Heart Health

By Satesh Bidaisee, Associate Professor of Public Health and Preventive Medicine, St. George's University
April 9, 2019

Heart disease kills more than 600,000 Americans and costs the country about $200 billion each year.[1][2]

Many of these deaths could be prevented if people simply exercised more. One in four Americans sits for more than eight hours each day.[3] Less than a quarter meet the federal exercise guidelines.[4]

Plenty of research shows that inactive lifestyles can lead to heart problems. Consider one analysis by researchers in the United Kingdom. Researchers examined 18 studies that included nearly 800,000 people. They found that people who sat for much of the day were nearly 150 percent more likely to suffer from a cardiovascular event — like a heart attack or stroke — than people who are constantly on their feet.[5]

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Here’s How to Stay Healthy During Flu Season

By Satesh Bidaisee, Associate Professor of Public Health and Preventive Medicine, St. George's University
March 7, 2019

Flu season is far from over. Health officials recently warned that the 2018-19 flu season could last until May.[1]

The flu isn’t a minor bug — it’s a life-threatening illness. The disease can cause pneumonia, bronchitis, and even heart attacks.[2][3] Over 80,000 people died from the flu during last year’s season, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.[4]

The flu is also easily spread. People can remain contagious for weeks after getting infected.[5]

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To Reduce the Rural Doctor Shortage, Train More Doctors from Rural Areas

By Fred Jacobs
February 14, 2019

Rural America is short on doctors. Only about 11 percent of physicians practice in rural communities — though nearly 20 percent of the population resides there.[1]

Medical schools can help alleviate this crisis by attracting more aspiring physicians from low-income, rural backgrounds.

Many doctors are reluctant to practice in rural areas. Only 3 percent of final-year medical residents want to work in an area with a population of 25,000 or less, according to a 2017 Merritt Hawkins survey. More than nine in ten want to practice in communities with more than 50,000 people.[2]

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