The Fight Against Diabetes Starts With Awareness

By StGeorgesUniversity
November 22, 2016

November is Diabetes Awareness Month, a time to stay informed about a disease that affects 29 million people in the United States, and hundreds of millions more across the globe.[1][2] Awareness is especially important to dealing with this epidemic, as approximately one third of those suffering from diabetes don’t know they have the disease.[3]

“Diabetes” refers to a group of metabolic diseases characterized by high blood sugar levels over a prolonged period of time. There are three general forms of the illness: Type 1, Type 2, and Gestational diabetes.

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Zika Virus Highlights the Need for International Health Programs

By Calum Macpherson, Dean of the School of Graduate Studies and Director of Research at St. George's University
November 21, 2016

Zika is spreading fast.

The virus, which is spread primarily by mosquitoes, has no known cure or treatment. It can cause fever, conjunctivitis, and headaches, among other things. Pregnant women with the virus can give birth to babies with underdeveloped brains.

So far, 48 countries and territories in the Caribbean and the Americas have reported cases of active Zika transmission.[1] Experts predict even more cases of the virus in the U.S.[2]

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The Future of Food Safety: Electronic Monitoring

By Satesh Bidaisee, Associate Professor of Public Health and Preventive Medicine, St. George's University
October 18, 2016

Woman chooses meat in the storeCould Amazon product reviews predict outbreaks of food poisoning?

Researchers at the University of Washington think so. They’ve developed a data mining algorithm that retroactively identifies contaminated food products based on negative reviews. The team hopes to refine the method to predict future food-safety lapses in real time. That would enable faster recalls and potentially save lives.[1]

This project is helping bring food safety into the digital era. And the effort is sorely needed. America’s food supply chain lacks transparency and efficiency. Modernizing this process would better protect the 48 million Americans who currently get foodborne illnesses each year.[2]

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