Urbanization Brings Together People — and Disease

By Calum Macpherson, Dean of the School of Graduate Studies and Director of Research at St. George's University
April 19, 2017

If you’ve ever taken a trip to a major city like New York, Mexico City, or Beijing, then you’ve seen what urbanization looks like firsthand. You’ve squeezed while walking down crowded sidewalks, packed into a tight elevator or subway car, and watched cars and buses cram into narrow streets. You might have thought to yourself: is it just me, or does this seem like very little space for a whole lot of people?

Don’t worry, it’s not just you — people are flocking to towns and cities at unprecedented rates.[1] About 3.4 billion people, or over 50 percent of the world’s population, currently inhabit urban areas across the world.[2] [3] That number is only expected to rise — the World Health Organization estimates that 70 percent of all people will live in towns and cities by 2050.[4] Read More »

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Veterinarians Are on the Front Lines of Food Safety

By Timothy Ogilvie, Dean of the School of Veterinary Medicine at St. George's University
March 24, 2017

When many people think of veterinarians, they picture a medical professional who cares for animals. But vets play a crucial role in human health as well — particularly when it comes to keeping our food safe.

Indeed, large animal veterinarians – those who treat animals raised to produce food such as meat, milk and eggs – are on the front line of defense in protecting our food supply from animal-borne and transmissible diseases, known as “zoonotic” diseases. Read More »

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Cooking Comes Clean

By Calum Macpherson, Dean of the School of Graduate Studies and Director of Research at St. George's University
March 8, 2017

Picture this: a woman and her child are at home, working together to make dinner for their family. They use a traditional, indoor stove and burn wood to get a fire going. As the fire grows, dark smoke fills the room. Black soot covers the walls of their house. The mother and child start to cough as the toxic fumes fill their lungs. But they push through — or risk going without a cooked meal for the night.

For many of us, this might sound like a story straight out of the 1800s. But for nearly half the global population, this is a part of everyday life. Read More »

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