The future of primary care depends on foreign-trained doctors

By Fred Jacobs
July 10, 2018

The United States and Canada lack enough primary care doctors. And those shortages are expected to get worse in the near future. Both nations will need to turn to international medical graduates to ensure citizens can access timely medical care.

In the United States, nearly 85 million people already live in an area that is short on primary care doctors.[1]

That figure will skyrocket as the country’s demand for doctors grows. From now until 2030, the population will increase by nearly 11 percent, according to a report from the Association of American Medical Colleges. The number of people over age 65 will surge 50 percent.[2] Consequently, the United States will be short up to 49,300 primary care physicians by 2030.[3]

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Go to sleep, America. It’ll save your health — and the economy

By Satesh Bidaisee, Associate Professor of Public Health and Preventive Medicine, St. George's University
June 26, 2018

Nearly a third of American adults aren’t getting enough sleep.

That’s not surprising given the demands of today’s workforce. The increasingly globalized, digitized world requires many employees to be available around the clock across multiple time zones. And plenty of people work day and night shifts.

That’s not just bad for health — it’s also terrible for the economy.[1] Sleep deprivation can make day-to-day activities much more challenging. People often struggle to process information quickly and accurately. That kills productivity.

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A healthy population requires a diverse doctor workforce

By Dr. G. Richard Olds, President of St. George's University
May 29, 2018

Only 6 percent of U.S. doctors are African American, Hispanic, or Native American — even though these groups account for nearly one-third of the U.S. population.[1]

The lack of diversity in the physician workforce is a problem. Minority doctors are more likely to practice in underserved communities. To ensure equal access to care, our medical institutions must promote diversity.

Minority doctors are more likely to treat minority patients. A JAMA study found that even though nonwhite physicians only make up a fraction of total doctors, they care for more than half of minority patients and seven in ten non-English-speaking patients.[2]

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